The cure for cults that want to deny others
their freedom of speech is more freedom of speech
-- Fredric Rice

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Creationist Cults

The notoriously bizarre Institute for Creation Research (sic) cult routinely publishes equally bizarre religious notions which they wish to pretend are some how scientific. This text file takes some of the cult's own bizarre publications and takes a look at them in extract to show just how nutty (verging on the insane) these "Modern Day Flat Earth Society" nuts actually are.

Copyright by The Skeptic Tank, 2002, all rights reserved. Permission is granted to disseminate this criticism freely provided no fees or costs are associated with the document's free distribution among academia and the lay public.


Ah, I had been anticipating getting around to this stupidity. I'm so glad I had the time to address this nuttiness since it's one of my most favored of creationist stupidities. I speak of none other than the brain dead morons who think there's a mystical magical boat out there somewhere in the world within which a bunch of people and a whole hell of a lot of animals rode out some kind of world-wide global flood.

You would not believe the profoundly disturbed individuals that have come through the FidoNet HolySmoke echo forum claiming that there's a "Noah's ark" resting on a mountain top somewhere. And they all like to demand that it's been repeatedly found, visited, even photographed by satelites. And the reason why nobody thinks to present this amazing find? Well most claim that it's a conspiracy. Some suggest that scientists "wouldn't believe it anyhow" so they're free to not even bother presenting the location of this amazing find.

Turkey has such a problem with cultists coming to their country and walking all over the mountains looking for this stupid notion that they enforce bans on these nutters. Cultists immediately demand that it's part of the conspiracy to keep the truth out of the public schools, of course, yet the government of Turkey has had their fill of cultists getting held up and killed by bandits who go into the mountains and hills looking for religious nuts to waylay that they imposed bans and restrictions. And if bandits aren't enough the Turkish government has been forced to get out there and rescue "ark hunters" from a variety of stupid hazards cultists get themselves into while walking around the mountains.

Dr. Martin Leipzig is a paleontologists who sold out to the oil business and has spend considerable time all over the world and has made friends in Turkey. His exploits have been written up and are available on The Skeptic Tank and I'd encourage you to look for them since they're not only highly amusing, they delve into what Turkey has to think about Christian cultists that suffer under the delusion that there's a magical boat somewhere in their country.

-- Begin quoted text in extract -=-

Since the search for the Ark began in the 1940s, evidence has continued to mount that the remains of a barge-like structure still exist somewhere on Mt. Ararat in eastern Turkey.

-=- End quoted text in extract

Sure it does, George. Sure it does. It's invisible, right?

-- Begin quoted text in extract -=-

This evidence consists primarily of reports by individuals who claim to have seen the Ark.

-=- End quoted text in extract

Yeah, individuals who some how can never seem to find it again when people who are capable of thinking are anywhere in the area. We'll fast forward:

-- Begin quoted text in extract -=-

The Bible claims that "the Ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat..."

-=- End quoted text in extract

Yes, the Christanic mythologies are filled with myths, all of them equally mythological. In the previous versions of the Epic of Gilgamesh from which this flood mythology comes the magical boat comes down elsewhere. In the Summarian myologies it was a seed pod, not a boat. A _big_ seed pod, you understand.

-- Begin quoted text in extract -=-

The Bible tells us something of the construction of the Ark...

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Yes, and it's amazing that anybody actually believes it.

The ICR nut continues:

-- Begin quoted text in extract -=-

My first trip to eastern Turkey was in 1971, and I have returned twelve times since, the last being in 1989. Some expeditions have been more successful than others, but each has been an adventure. The difficulties primarily lie in gaining access to the mountain from the central government, and in dealing with local officials.

-=- End quoted text in extract

Yes, the "difficult" government keeps having to rescue these idiots from their own stupidity. The claim that some "expeditions" have been "more successful than others" is a strange claim. Is this ICR nut actually claiming that previous "expeditions" have actually found this magical boat?

-- Begin quoted text in extract -=-

Interestingly enough, there are a few individuals who claim the Ark has already been found.

-=- End quoted text in extract

Yes, delusional fools abound, it seems. Funny they have no evidence, isn't it? One wonders whether these cultists also travel the world looking for Wonder Woman's magic invisible airplane. No difference.


Any text written by the creationist cult which may be quoted within this criticial examination of the creationist cult is provided according to U. S. Code Title 17 "Fair Use" dictates which may be reviewed at http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html


"You can lie about ICR all you want." -- Jason Daniel Henderson

"Thank you for your permission however there's never any need to.
Creationist propaganda is already self-debunking." -- Fredric L. Rice

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